Mushroom Hunting Great Success


Yesterday I took a day to roam around the beautiful woods hereabouts and pick some shrooms. I have been seeking Boletus edulis for some years, as they are claimed to be present but I have rarely found locals that know and can reliably identify the species. One of my neighbors can, and they are acclaimed as good eating around the world. [I here refer to the tasty mushrooms, and not my neighbor, despite what AOC's overexcitable cannibal fans or Swedish academics might think.]

Welp, I finally found one that I am absolutely confident is the right species, and therefore will cook up and eat! A great milestone for me, and very educational since the reason I have not found them before is that I haven't looked under shore pines on ancient dunes before (my neighbor told me she had found them there).

Bedulis.jpg

Frankly I have avoided that habitat because Tricholoma murillianum (formerly Armillaria ponderosa), an exquisite and highly desirable mushroom that can sell for $250/lb., grows there, and various armed gangs actually guard patches of them, encounters with which tend to dampen my enjoyment of foraging. I reckon I beat the Russians, Cambodians, and Vietnamese to this one LOL

I also found a lot of Chanterelles, Cantharellus cibarius.

Ccibarius.jpg

These are not down by the sea where the B. edulis was, but high in the mountains. There are so many coral mushrooms around right now it's hard to avoid stepping on them, and many species of different colors from white, cream, golden, pink, brown, and carmine red abound - none of which I know to be edible - of various genuses from Ramaria, Clavaria, and Clavellina. My camera (phone) is very poor at taking low light pics, so I am sorry for the washed out photos, but it's all I have to take pics with. I didn't take any pics of the corals because like the above Chanterelle, the details and colors are just blank white flash.

I found some edible Toothed Jelly fungus, Pseudohydnum gelatinosum, but didn't pick them as I had a couple kilos of Chanterelles already, and the jellies are very bland and soft, so I left them for wildlife. This pic shows their color and translucence though, at least on the specimen to the far left, which may help you identify them in your neck of the woods.

Jellyfungus.jpg

I also found Angel's Wings, Pleurocybella porrigens, or a pure white variety of oyster mushroom that is quite delectable (there are two incidents involving P. porrigens in Japan that indicate the variety there can occasionally be toxic for those with liver problems. I am not in Japan, and don't have liver problems, so I eat them without concern). I didn't pick these either, as they were growing on a log that was at the very end of suitability for the species, and the remnant of the likely once huge colony was very small, the largest cap about ~1 inch across.

Pporrigens.jpg

While down on the dunes grown over by shore pines I found emerging Amanita muscaria, Fly Agaric, or Magic Mushrooms, some buttons of which have been devoured by native leopard slugs.

Amuscariamarauder.jpg

Amuscaria.jpg

Last year I found an amazing specimen of Chicken of the Woods, or Sulphur shelf, Laetiporus sulphureus, on a standing snag over a meter thick.

laetiporussulphureus.jpg

Probably over 100 kilos of fruiting bodies in this pic alone, and all sides of the 10 meter plus tall snag bore them. Sometime between then and now the snag fell, and here's how it looks presently.

Lsulphureusfallen.jpg

There are other parts of the broken snag, with tasty mushrooms growing on them as well, scattered down the steep hillside.

Lastly, I found the very tasty parasitic fungus known as the Lobster mushroom, Hypomyces lactofluorum, because it is the bright orange red color of freshly boiled lobster and other ocean crustaceans. This pic doesn't show that red color well, but the strange shape is visible in the mushroom about in the center of this pic.

Lobster.jpg

I did take a lot more pics, but few of them are not washed out by the flash. Maybe I'll figure out a way to take better pics as the season progresses. I'll see what I can do.

Hope you enjoy these pics and the info half as much as I did tramping around in the woods taking them!

Edit: I realized just now I had mislabeled the picture I included of the half eaten A. muscaria the slug was leaving, so I deleted the pic. I will see about finding the right pic and sticking it in, but none of the distinctive red cap was left, so I may not bother as it didn't add much to the post.
Forgive my error.


Comments 25


Wow, $250 USD / lb? I've never heard of these before - nice forage bounty!

Posted using Partiko Android

07.10.2019 23:28
3

The prices vary, and since the gangs have really increased commercial harvest, the prices have plunged of late. This may presage increasing disinterest by such profit focused parties going forward, at least that's my hope. I rarely sell mushrooms, but eat all I can, preserving many for when they aren't in season, and give a lot away.

To harvest them commercially, there's a bunch of paperwork and regulations that do not apply to individuals foraging for personal use, which is fine with me as I am not particularly interested in managing quantities of money that attract larcenous avarice. My quality of life has increased dramatically since I have discovered how to manage my affairs with very little money.

Barter is untaxable, and most people don't realize how much of their life is drained away by taxes alone. Up to half your work is caused by taxation if you use money as the primary means of trading for the goods and services necessary. As decentralization burgeons, I expect more and more folks to discover that less and less of the things they require need to be bought with money, and also how that dramatically improves their quality of life.

Mushroom sales are taxable. I'm not picking mushrooms so I can murder brown people all over the world. I sleep a lot better at night avoiding such liabilities.

08.10.2019 01:30
1

Very nice - we don't forage for money either, but I honestly can't think of anything in this area that has so much value at market. Morels typically sell well at farmer's markets, but we eat everything we find too. Foraging is a wonderful thing.

08.10.2019 02:15
1

There are various medicinal crops domestic and wild that actually are worth more per pound, and vastly more in the broader economy, such as cannabis. Although, the price has dropped so much since legalization I'm not sure cannabis exceeds that dollar value per pound anymore =)

Wild seeds necessary to reclamation projects can be worth more per pound, particularly in the Great Basin. You might be surprised that porcupine quills are worth ~$10/oz, and Bobcat hides ~$400 each. Products used by florists, such as fern fronds, moss, and 'Old Man's Beard' lichen are all more valuable as products to the economy than Mastutakes, if not per pound.

08.10.2019 04:18
0

That's a pretty unnerving thought, armed gangs in the woods! Glad you didn't run into one.
I've never seen a slug quite like that one. Quite pretty for something slimy. 😄

Posted using Partiko Android

07.10.2019 23:32
2

I usually pick mushrooms as I am hunting, and being armed tends to incite anxiety in the guards. I was unarmed yesterday, and didn't run into any gangs. I agree it was good to be free of them =)

08.10.2019 01:20
0

We have slugs that like that banana slug in NZ, but it is darker. They love mushrooms, haha. I just ordered some lion's mane mushrooms, hoping they would improve my memory again. The last batch did.

08.10.2019 00:12
1

In Oz there is a similar mollusc that is singularlly colored, the Pink Slug. About the same size but hot pink. Life is amazing =) I am told Lion's mane can be found locally, and I look, but have never seen it. Perhaps it associates with species other than the primary Spruce, Hemlock, and Douglas Fir I tend to hunt and haunt. Along the river draws there are higher concentrations of hardwoods like Cottonwood and Bigleaf Maple, but that tends to be nasty thickets here in the rainforest, and I ramble in steeper, but less tangled forests as a rule.

I am confident that NZ has a bounty of native mushrooms, and tramping about innawoods might do you some good. I know it does me. I tried living in cities, in deserts, and on frozen tundras, but the deep woods is home.

08.10.2019 01:38
1

Armed gangs!! No way! I know mushrooms can fetch a high price, but it didn't occur to me that they'd go this far! Nuts. Love mushroom season in any hemisphere for all the beautiful mushroom pics - enjoyed muchly, thankyou!

08.10.2019 00:58
1

Once I realized what the ethnically pure groups of armed men shouting excitedly at me while I was hunting were, I changed my venues for hunting, and avoid areas where they have productive patches to harvest. It took a while, since I couldn't understand a word of Vietmanese, Cambodian, or Russian, and they seemed to not be interested in speaking English. I suppose they didn't need to in order to chase people away, as brandishing AK-47s gets the message across.

I first thought they were guarding marijuana grows, or methlabs in the forests, but learned of their mercenary mushrooming from buyers who kindly let me know not to harass their suppliers if I wanted to keep selling to them. I didn't, so don't, and pick shrooms elsewhere now. I hear Russians claim the area I was in yesterday and saw a cluster of tents that I widely skirted around. I also only found the one King Bolete, which was in a pretty hidden copse they must have missed in their morning harvests.

I might look further up the coast and farther from the village, where the costs and difficulties of running picking gangs might make the Ceps and Matsutakes less than profitable for their effort.

08.10.2019 01:47
0

Thats insane!!! Where on earth do you live??

08.10.2019 01:55
0

Oregon, right on the central Pacific Coast.

08.10.2019 02:29
0

Ok that makes more sense. Still quite insane. Especially for an Australian! Xx

08.10.2019 02:44
0

LOL Don't poke fun at crazy 'Muricans! Or our valued immigrant community =)

08.10.2019 04:27
0

You move?...I recall after I came onto steemit you saying you lived in Ohio and was a contractor. One of the reasons I equate your name to living in the state below me.

08.10.2019 09:36
0

You misrecall. I am a handyman, not a licensed contractor, and in Oregon, not Ohio.

08.10.2019 20:06
0

I never knew you were such a fun g............ (okay, I won't finish that)
Cool pics. Glad you found what you were looking for :)
Anyone interested in how fungi fit into the grand scheme of things on Earth can check out this old post.

08.10.2019 01:14
9

I am a big fan of life, and quite fond of fungi for many reasons. They do some amazing things, and some of them are very tasty.

Some scientists have remarked that the unique genetic structure of some fungi seem to indicate an extraterrestrial origin. I dunno about that, but 'Omnivore' was one of my favorite books growing up. If I see a mushroom hopping about on one leg and peering at me voraciously with it's solitary eye, I will be sure to see if I have mixed my mushroom harvest up with LBMs on accident, rather than suspect alien fungal assault, however.

Mushrooms and I have an equitable arrangement: they want their spores spread and fertilized, and I want to make fertilizer out their delicious and sporulant fruiting bodies. Some folks consider predation a savage and one-sided affair, but it's mutually profitable for concerned parties. In this vein, I note the huge increase in population of species most amenable to domestication and consumption by H. sapiens.

Predators are essential to the prosperity of their prey, and most folks are unaware of this.

08.10.2019 03:47
0

If I see a mushroom hopping about on one leg and peering at me voraciously with it's solitary eye

never looked at them like that. but now as you say it.
maybe shrooms are big fucking aliens who just wanna look what's happening above them every autumn. :D

15.10.2019 05:01
0

'Omnivore' is a science fiction story from the Golden Age, fungi were the dominant life form(s) on their planet, and that's where I got the image of one-legged, one-eyed hoppers about looking to eat me.

15.10.2019 07:15
0

damn. I really need more knowledge about shrooms.
I just find it so hard to find someone with skills and experience to identify shrooms and teach me.. :/
that slug! :O

15.10.2019 04:57
1

I seem to recall you are from Germany? I bet Chanterelles, Fly Agaric, and Boletes grow there too. I know the latter two species do, and I am pretty sure Chanterelles do too. I have read a lot of folks pick Morels, and various other species in Europe and Asia that I am less familiar with. I know there are mushrooms worthy of the most exacting gourmand there, and so I am sure there are people that pick them there too.

I found a mycologist locally that I would bring samples to that I though might be good ones from what I read and saw in field guides. That was what really got me started, but after I was out innawoods picking I ran across others that were foraging, and went from there.

There must be universities, clubs, or buyers of wild mushrooms where you are. If you get a good field guide, like Peterson's or Audubon's, and wander around innawoods, you will find things that look likely to take to experts to ask about. I was wandering innawoods anyway, so it was a sort of natural addition to hunting.

Nothing quite like Stag sirloin in Jack Daniel's sauce with fresh Chanterelles over a campfire on Elk Mountain to encourage one to continue =) I was sold for life on the spot. Dinner tonite was Chanterelles sauteed in brown sugar bacon and onions over pasta with a cheese and tomato sauce. Sure sounds better than mac and cheese with mushrooms and ketchup.

Tastes better too.

15.10.2019 07:38
0

Where is this what country
It is beautiful

18.10.2019 06:39
1

It's the Oregon coast range. It is damp (raining all day today) which is good for trees - and mushrooms!

18.10.2019 10:00
1