Guava and its benefits



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The guava is a small tree or shrub whose height does not exceed 4.5 meters. Almost all weather conditions are suitable for this tree. The 15 cm long leaves are oval. The individual flowers of the plant are grouped into leaf breasts. Large white flowers have many white-green stamens. The fruit of the guava is round, similar to a pear or oval, with a pleasant musky aroma. Inside the fruit there is a yellow, red or pink pulp with many hard seeds (100-500 seeds).

Guava bark and immature fruits have the greatest biological value. Guava can grow in dry and humid climates. A young tree is very sensitive to frost. For clay, heavy clay, sand, gravel and even limestone are suitable. The plant responds well to soil drainage. Since the guava has a superficial root system, the tree needs to be watered in a timely manner.

Guava can bloom all year. There are tree species that need cross pollination. Many varieties of guava are pollinated. You can take a brush and gently transfer pollen from one flower to another, thus increasing the amount of useful ovaries. Guava fruits ripen 3-5 months after the flowering period. The fruits of the plant contain a large amount of vitamin C, so they are recommended for colds and flu.

Very often, guava is spread by seeds that germinate in 14-20 days. Guava is also propagated using cuttings, but to root it is necessary to create high temperature and relative humidity.

Guava has an antimicrobial, bactericidal, astringent and antispasmodic effect. Guava contains a lot of fiber, B vitamins, calcium, phosphorus, proteins and fats.

Guava is a fruit that contains more vitamin C than an orange. For this reason, it is recommended to take it to people who want to strengthen the lymphatic system and raise the tone of the body.

Nutritionists argue that guava should be part of the dishes used by mothers and children who breastfeed, because it strengthens the immune system and is a means to restore strength.

Guava fruits are taken for diarrhea, asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, tonsillitis. Fresh leaves have a wound healing property, so they are used for skin diseases, boils and even toothaches.

Tea can be made with guava leaves, which will help with indigestion, dizziness, menstrual irregularities and dysentery.

Guava is widely used in folk medicine using the leaves, bark and flowers of a plant. A decoction made of leaves is used as an excellent cough remedy, to rinse your mouth, throat and, in case of an ulcer, as a pain reduction. Guava broth is used for skin diseases or as an antipyretic. If you perform a combined decoction of the bark with leaves, you will get a tool that separates the placenta after delivery.


Comments 1


Guava fruits ripen 3-5 months after the flowering period. The fruits of the plant contain a large amount of vitamin C, so they are recommended for colds and flu.

Resteem

SteemChurch Farm (@farms)

27.08.2019 06:58
2