Necron Warriors: A Tabletop Miniatures Review


I have completed my initial Necron troops for a Kill Team squad! Games Workshop (often abbreviated as GW) published Kill Team as a skirmish counterpart for their larger-scale Warhammer 40,000 space opera war game, and it gives me the opportunity to dabble in a few armies other than my usual Orks. As with most tabletop games, assembly and painting are at least as much a part of the hobby as actually playing the game, and players may choose unique color schemes and make unique modifications to their models so their armies are more personalized.

20190830_000745.jpg

For my Necrons, I decided to use the typical silver color scheme with green details. I have seen some really neat models made with different paint jobs, but it just felt right to go with the classic Egyptian Terminator aesthetic. I primed them in silver first. A black ink wash brought out the details, and I painted the guns black. Then silver paint dry-brushed over everything tidied up the works. Two shades of green brought out the special icons and gun hoses. It's not going to win any awards, but it's a good tabletop standard paint job. The bases will eventually all get styrene stripes as an homage to stark Necron aesthetics and iconography.

Proper customization is limited to my Flayed Ones. I made them using Milliput for skin, Gauss Flayer bayonets, bits of sprue, and some 3rd party pieces. The tentacles were made by rolling some Milliput on comb teeth. Because these guys are supposed to be insane robot zombies, I used a sepia ink wash instead of black to make them seem a bit more decayed and rusted. No one else has Flayed Ones like mine, and I didn't spend an absurd sum on the official models.

20190830_002307.jpg
Left: sprue claws. Right: bayonet hands.

20190830_002250.jpg
Left: Mantic claw and Milliput tentacles. Right: heads and other body parts, mostly Mantic.

Oh, and about that odd extra warrior... I plan to include an Ork kommando in all Kill Team squads I build because I find it amusing. I used a standard shoota boy and added a styrene tube to extend the barrel of his gun, and then cut a choppa from a spare melee weapon arm for the bayonet. I also used actual copper wire for the barrel band. Some spiky bitz on the muzzle completed the look I wanted. The armor is silver and the gun barrel is green because some Orks do understand camouflage.

20190830_002812.jpg

20190830_002653-01.jpeg

As you can see in the picture above, I dry-fitted the weapon arms and glued them as a subassembly for painting the Ork. On the Necrons, the ball-and-socket joints required painting the body assembly, the right arm assembly, and the left arm bit separately before putting it all together.

20190830_004209.jpg

How do these guys compare to other sci-fi robot warriors? Pictured above, to the right of the Necron Warrior are two Super Battle Droids from the Wizards of the Coast Star Wars Miniatures Game. To the left are two Terminator Genisys Endoskeletons. Either could be used as proxy soldiers if glued to the right base size, although some gamers frown on using an army composed of unofficial models, and non-GW minis won't fly in any official tournament. I say if they look the part and fit the scale reasonably well, play what you want in a friendly game. If you want actual Terminators, do it. Just make sure people know what they represent. But the price for Necron warriors isn't bad by GW standards. The models are old, and the layout of the frame is clearly not as optimized as newer releases, but the kit is well made. Since they come in a set of twelve, I still have four unbuilt models on their frame in my trades box at the time of this post, too.

20190830_010425.jpg

As for how they play, that remains to be seen. My schedule doesn't work well with the game nights at my local game shop, and the word "local" is a bit of a stretch here. Necrons are resilient, though. Their special rule gives them a chance to heal completely when they take damage, so they are a frustrating foe to take down. This makes up considerably for their poor movement and average combat stats.


Comments 8


it was a long time ago for me, but i used to really love table-top games like this and i would go out of my way to customize all the figurines. It was the late 80's but the hobby shops actually had pewter replacement figures for all of our favorite games and I bought plenty of them. It was so long ago that I don't even remember the name of the games but oh, those are such great memories.

I'm happy to see that this still carries on today.

30.08.2019 17:57
1

If you want to get back into the scene, Kill Team and Malifaux are perfect. A rule book, a box of minis, and you're pretty much set.

30.08.2019 18:02
0

Hi jacobtothe,

This post has been upvoted by the Curie community curation project and associated vote trail as exceptional content (human curated and reviewed). Have a great day :)

Visit curiesteem.com or join the Curie Discord community to learn more.

30.08.2019 17:58
2

Thanks for the trail!

30.08.2019 18:14
0


This post was shared in the Curation Collective Discord community for curators, and upvoted and resteemed by the @c-squared community account after manual review.
@c-squared runs a community witness. Please consider using one of your witness votes on us here

30.08.2019 23:11
1

Ohhhhh, you brought me back to my childhood, I had some dolls that were being built and I happily haha, thanks for sharing!

31.08.2019 02:35
0

Sup Dork?!? Enjoy the Upvote!!! Keep up with the dorky content for more love!!!

31.08.2019 15:33
1