Non Citrus Foods With Vitamin C


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Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is perhaps the most famous member of the vitamin family, and citrus fruits are likely the most well-known sources of Vitamin C. However, the consumption of citrus fruits, which include lemons, limes, oranges, grapefruit and tangerines, can often produce allergic reactions and other negative effects in some people. There are many noncitrus foods with a high vitamin C content, and some have an even higher percentage of this essential vitamin than citrus fruits.

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Bell Peppers

Bell peppers have one of the highest vitamin C contents. They rank No. 2 on the Cleveland Clinic’s list of 35 power foods with the greatest amount of nutrients, the fewest calories and the most health benefits. A half-cup of chopped red bell pepper has only 20 calories, but 240 percent of the daily recommended amount of vitamin C and 45 percent of vitamin A. A red bell pepper has a higher vitamin C content than citrus fruits. A half-cup of chopped yellow bell pepper also has 20 calories and contains 230 percent of vitamin C. Consuming a half-cup of green bell pepper provides 20 calories and 60 percent of the recommended daily value of vitamin C.

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Berries

Berries are also a beneficial source of vitamin C and are No. 18 of the 35 power foods listed by the Cleveland Clinic. The most popular member of the berry family, strawberries contain 25 calories per half-cup. They have an 80 percent vitamin C content, as well as 7 percent dietary fiber. Ranging from medium to bright red hues, 1 cup of raspberries has 60 calories, 50 percent vitamin of the recommended daily value of C and 36 percent of dietary fiber. Blackberries provide 25 percent of the recommended vitamin C, as well as 147 percent of the dietary fiber with 30 calories.

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Papaya

In America, the most readily available kind of papaya is the Hawaiian – also known as Solo – variety. This pear-shaped fruit is No. 22 on the Cleveland Clinic’s list of 35 power foods. A half-cup of papaya cubes contains only 25 calories, but delivers 70 percent of the recommended daily value of vitamin C and 15 percent of vitamin A.

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Potatoes

The potato and sweet potato are eighth and ninth, respectively, on the Cleveland Clinic’s list of top 35 power foods. For 160 calories, a medium potato contains 30 percent of the recommended daily allowance of vitamin C, 14 percent of dietary fiber and 10 percent of daily iron. Consuming a half-cup of baked sweet potatoes provides 90 calories and 35 percent of the daily recommendation for vitamin C. This serving also delivers 380 percent of vitamin A and 11 percent of dietary fiber.

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Other Considerations

Other foods with vitamin C include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cantaloupe and greens such as collards, turnips, mustards and kale. In addition, some foods, including grape juice cocktail, cranberry juice cocktail and some brands of cereal, have vitamin C added to them. The University of Florida warns that vitamin C can be destroyed by improper storage, preparation and cooking methods. Therefore, consume raw fruits and vegetables as soon after purchase as possible. To help retain vitamin C levels, avoid overcooking by preparing vegetables quickly in the least amount of water, and if possible, microwave, steam or stir-fry the vegetables.



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